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Frequently Asked Questions
Projects on the Horizon
  1. Is the DECA Program available in Spanish?
  2. Will the DECA Program be translated into other languages?
  3. Does Devereux provide anything similar for zero to two-year-olds?
  4. Are any pilot sites using the DECA Program?
  5. What other projects are included in the Devereux Early Childhood Initiative?

Administering the DECA

  1. Who should serve as the rater in a team teaching situation?
  2. Is it appropriate to translate the DECA Record Form for parents who do not speak English or Spanish or who speak limited English or Spanish?
  3. Is it appropriate to read the DECA Record Form to parents who have difficulty reading?
  4. How close in time should the parent rating and the teacher ratings be completed?
  5. Is it acceptable to photocopy the DECA results in order to give a copy to parents?
  6. What is meant by item #17, or #2, or #7, etc. … on the DECA Record Form?
  7. How long do you need to know a child before administering the DECA?
  8. Is it appropriate to use the DECA with 6-year olds?
  9. How many times per year should a program administer the DECA?
  10. What is the difference between a DECA user and a DECA rater?
  11. If a rater feels they cannot answer certain items on the DECA, what should they do?
  12. What is Devereux’s recommendation regarding questions # 8 and #14 which some people have difficulty answering appropriately?

Summarizing DECA Results

  1. When scoring the DECA, what should be done with blank items?
  2. Why aren't there different norms for different age levels?
  3. Why are there different norms for parents and teachers?
  4. Why is there no category for "strength" in the behavioral concern domain?
  5. Why are the protective factors on the DECA Classroom Profile (Observation Journal, p.55) listed in a different order than on the DECA Record Form and Individual Profile?
  6. Why are there only 19 spaces for children on the DECA Classroom Profile?
  7. Where do I find the information needed to interpret changes in a child’s T-scores from pre-test to post-test?
  8. How do our children's DECA scores compare to other sites using the DECA Program and the national standardization sample?

Parent Involvement

  1. How are parents involved in the DECA Program?
  2. Is parental consent needed in order to administer the DECA?

DECA Program Goals and Philosophy

  1. Is the DECA Program designed to help kids with behavior problems?
  2. Does the DECA fit with other instruments a program may be using?
  3. What makes the DECA Program better than the social/emotional or behavioral checklist my program is already using?
  4. Should the DECA results be used to refer a child for a formal evaluation?
  5. What is the difference between the DECA and the DECA-C?
  6. Is the DECA an assessment, a screener or both?
  7. Should the DECA be used with children who have special needs?
  8. Why should a program conduct running records observations?

DECA Program Challenges

  1. What are some ways to overcome observation challenges in the classroom?

Training and Technical Assistance for the DECA Program

  1. An Early Childhood Program wants to learn more about the DECA Program. What presentation options are available?
  2. An Early Childhood Program has purchased (or is in the process or purchasing) the DECA Program. What intensive implementation trainings are available?
  3. An Early Childhood Program has trained their staff, but wants access to ongoing technical assistance from a qualified trainer. What options are available?
  4. Are CEUs offered for DECA Program Training?

Infant & Toddler

  1. Coming Soon!

Other Questions

  1. How do I order the children's story, Bob "Butterbean" Love?
  2. How do I order the software for playing Jeopardy?
  3. How do I order the “Starting Small” kit?
  4. Some of the books in For Now and Forever are out of print, what other children's books does Devereux recommend?
  5. What DECA Program Kit Resources do I need to order for my program/classroom(s)?
Answers: Projects on the Horizon
  1. Is the DECA Program available in Spanish?

    A:
    The Spanish version of the DECA Record Form, For Now and Forever, and Classroom Strategies guide are available.

  2. Will the DECA Program be translated into other languages?

    A: As Devereux becomes aware of the need for DECA materials to be translated into other languages, frequent requests will be passed on to Kaplan, the publisher, for consideration. If your program has a need for mass production of the DECA and For Now and Forever parent guides to be available in other languages, please make Devereux aware by calling toll free (866) TRAIN US or contacting us via our online form.

  3. Does Devereux provide anything similar for zero to two-year-olds?

    A:
    The Devereux Early Childhood Assessment for Infants and Toddlers (DECA-I/T) will be available in the Fall of 2006. Appendix A (p.158-168) of the Classroom Strategies guide offers tips for helping infants and toddlers develop protective factors.

  4. Are any pilot sites using the DECA Program?

    A:
    Many early childhood programs (Head Start programs, child care centers, etc.) are implementing the DECA Program throughout the country. The 1999-2000 Program year brought in feedback and research from ten pilot sites which were located in the following states: PA, NJ, GA, OH, FL, KY, and CO. Pilot research and additional research studies are presently underway. Research data is available on our website at http://www.devereuxearlychildhood.org/.

  5. What other projects are included in the Devereux Early Childhood Initiative?

    A:
    Other Devereux Early Childhood Initiative (DECI) Projects and Resources:
      • DECA-C (Clinical version): Now available
      • Consultation/ training packages: Now available
      • Caring for the Children, Caring for Yourself: A resource to help adults reflect upon and improve their own protective factors: Now available
      • Mentoring Training on the DECA Program: Now available
      • Computerized scoring of the DECA Record Forms: Now availablee
      • A series of parent guides and training sessions based on For Now and Forever
      • Infant/Toddler Assessment: (available 2006)
      • School-Aged Assessment: (available 2007)

Answers: Administering the DECA

  1. Who should serve as the rater in a team teaching situation?

    A:
    The rater should be the person who best meets these criteria:
      • He/she will most likely be available for the second and third administration
      • He/she has at least a sixth grade reading level
      • He/she has at least one year of teaching experience
      • He/she knows the child best
    * If BOTH teachers are equally qualified to rate the child, based on the above criteria, there are two basic options:

      1. Randomly assign half of the children in the class to each teacher/rater
      2. Have both teachers rate all the children, and then use the rater comparison table (User’s Guide table 4.2) to determine where teachers see significant differences in children so that the information can be discussed and used in planning.

  2. Is it appropriate to translate the DECA Record Form for parents who do not speak English or Spanish or who speak limited English or Spanish?

    A:
    Devereux recognizes that many programs serve children whose parents do not speak English or Spanish well enough to complete the standardized English or Spanish version of the assessment. While Devereux encourages parent involvement, parent ratings obtained through a translator should be interpreted with caution. Following are Devereux’s recommendations for programs serving families with limited English or Spanish:

    • These children should receive a teacher rating using the standardized assessment form.
    • The results of a translated assessment should not be scored since the translated assessment is no longer standardized. Rather, the results should be reviewed and interpreted with caution and used to foster communication with the parents about the child’s behavior in the home and how to best promote the child’s protective factors in the home environment.

  3. Is it appropriate to read the DECA Record Form to parents who have difficulty reading?

    A:
    Yes, as long as the questions are read exactly as they are written, using a neutral tone of voice. Readers should not attempt to influence the ratings in any way.

  4. How close in time should the parent rating and the teacher ratings be completed?

    A:
    Ideally, there should be no longer than a week between the parent and teacher ratings of the same child. We realize that this will not always be possible. However, one should only compare ratings within four weeks of each other.

  5. Is it acceptable to photocopy the DECA results in order to give a copy to parents?

    A:
    As the DECA is copyrighted, it would be a violation of the copyright to photocopy the DECA. In addition, giving parents a copy of the DECA results would affect the test-retest reliability. The best way to present results to parents is through a written summary of the child's strengths and areas for growth in both the home and classroom setting. A helpful resource to serve this purpose would be use of the "Protective Factors Observation Summary"; reproducible copies are found in the Observation Journal, p.57.

  6. What is meant by item #17, or #2, or #7, etc. … on the DECA Record Form?

    A:
    Raters should interpret each item according to their own experiences and perspectives. For example: it is likely that the word "inappropriate" has different meanings to different raters. The rating reflects the adult's perception of the child. If asked what an item on the DECA means, you should reply, “What does it mean to YOU?” And then encourage the rater to answer it according to their perception.

  7. How long do you need to know a child before administering the DECA?

    A:
    A minimum of four weeks is necessary to get to know each child prior to completing the DECA rating.

  8. Is it appropriate to use the DECA with 6-year olds?

    A:
    In general, if a child is five at the time of the first DECA administration, it is acceptable to administer the DECA again at mid-year and at the end-of-the-year, even if the child turns six during that time. However, do not administer the DECA to children who are already six-years old at the time of first administration. It is acceptable to use the DECA for most children in kindergarten, but not in 1st grade.

    ** For children who would be 6 at the time of first DECA administration, the DECI will soon be releasing the School-Aged version of the DECA.

  9. How many times per year should a program administer the DECA?

    A:
    Ideally, programs administer the DECA three times per year. This allows for periodic reviews of children's progress. Teachers can use these results to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies in supporting development of protective factors and minimizing or eliminating challenging behaviors. It is acceptable if a program prefers to administer the DECA only twice a year. The second DECA administration should be scheduled with enough time left in the program year to develop and implement plans based on the results.

  10. What is the difference between a DECA user and a DECA rater?

    A:
    A DECA user is the person who may be responsible for any of the following steps in the DECA Program process:
      • scoring the DECA
      • summarizing DECA results
      • planning strategies for the individual child
      • planning strategies for the classroom
    The DECA rater is the person or persons answering the 37-item DECA Record Form. In some instances, the DECA user and rater will be the same individual. In most instances, the parent will be a rater, not a user.

  11. If a rater feels they cannot answer certain items on the DECA, what should they do?

    A:
    Those items should be left blank. (See FAQ#17 for how to score a blank item).

  12. What is Devereux’s recommendation regarding questions # 8 and #14 which some people have difficulty answering appropriately?

    A:
    Every now and then we meet (or hear) from programs and individuals that have difficulty responding to item numbers 8 and 14 of the DECA. A suggestion we can offer to these individuals is to have the rater read the DECA item placing the rating frequency in the beginning of the sentence. For example #8 reads...fails to show joy or gladness at a happy occasion. If the parent/teacher reads the statement with the frequency in the beginning they may be better able to respond to the item.

    During the past for weeks,(enter child's name) .....
    NEVER failed to show joy or gladness at a happy occasion.
    RARELY failed to show joy or gladness at a happy occasion.
    OCCASIONALLY failed to show joy or gladness at a happy occasion.
    FREQUENTLY failed to show joy or gladness at a happy occasion.
    VERY FREQUENTLY failed to show joy or gladness at a happy occasion.

    This same mode will work for number 14 as well: have no reaction to children/adults.
Answers: Summarizing DECA Results
  1. When scoring the DECA, what should be done with blank items?

    A:
    Substitute the middle score, "2", for blank items. This ensures a neutral score. However, if there is more than one blank on any scale, or more than two blanks on the entire DECA Record Form, that rating should not be scored as there is too much missing information that may skew the results.

  2. Why aren't there different norms for different age levels?

    A:
    The DECA was standardized on 2,000 children across the country. No differences were found in the scores obtained for children 2 through 5-years of age. Subsequent focus groups and data collection showed that teachers and parents tended to have significant knowledge of the developmental appropriateness of children's behaviors. They applied this knowledge to appropriately rate children of different ages.

  3. Why are there different norms for parents and teachers?

    A:
    In the standardization sample, in general, parent ratings tended to be slightly higher than teacher ratings of the same child. Therefore, the norms for parent ratings are slightly higher than those for teacher ratings on some of the individual scales.

  4. Why is there no category for "strength" in the behavioral concern domain?

    A:
    It is not theoretically possible to have a “strength” in a behavioral concern. Therefore, if a
    child does not have behavioral concerns, it is described as being "typical" (T-scores of 59 and lower).

  5. Why are the protective factors on the DECA Classroom Profile (Observation Journal, p.55) listed in a different order than on the DECA Record Form and Individual Profile?

    A:
    Oops! This has been revised in the second printing of the DECA Program resources. Several other changes were made to planning forms in the second printing to reflect the needs of DECA users. The revised Classroom Profile is now in print. Please contact Devereux if you have the first version and need an updated copy of the form.

  6. Why are there only 19 spaces for children on the DECA Classroom Profile?

    A:
    If your Classroom Profile has only 19 spaces, you have the first version of this form. To obtain a revised copy of this form 20 spaces, please contact Devereux.

  7. Where do I find the information needed to interpret changes in a child’s T-scores from pre-test to post-test?

    A:
    Refer to the User's Guide, Chapter 4 (pg. 33-39), for discussion of Advanced Interpretation Methods. The User’s Guide also includes tables that allow you to interpret changes for those children whose pre-test scores were in the concern range (T-score of 40 or below). The complete “advanced interpretation” tables that allow you to interpret all scores (both scores that improved as well as scores that worsened) are included in this manual and can also be downloaded from our website.

  8. How do our children's DECA scores compare to other sites using the DECA Program and the national standardization sample?

    A
    : In order to develop a high quality assessment tool that could be used with children from across the nation, the DECA was nationally standardized, using a sample of 2,000 children who closely represented the United States population on in important demographic characteristics. In examining the data from those 2,000 children, it was determined that the cumulative frequency distributions for the scales that were derived through factor analysis all approached normality but were slightly positively skewed. For this reason, we decided to compute scores using normalization procedures. T-scores for each scale were set at a mean of 50 and a standardization of 10. Using this procedure, 68% of the scores on Initiative, Self-control and Attachment were less than 10 T-score points above or below the mean (this range is classified as the Typical range). 16% of the scores on each scale were either more than 10 T-score points above the mean (this range is classified as the Strength range) or more than 10 T-score points below the mean (this range is classified as the Concern range).

    Therefore, if your program's data has approximately 16% of children scoring in the strength or concern range on Initiative, Self-control and Attachment, and approximately 68% of children scoring in the Typical range, then your data closely approximates the national standardization data. If your data is not similar to the national standardization sample, several reasons may help explain the differences, such as:

    * The children served by your program are all extremely high-risk (or extremely low-risk) and therefore their scores are skewed away from the nationally standardized mean.
    * Your program has been implementing the DECA Program including strength-based planning which has significantly improved the protective factors scores

    * The majority of the children served by your program are from a particular ethnic or racial background. Children from different minority groups were included in the national standardization in the same proportion as their representation in the national population. .

Answers: Parent Involvement

  1. How are parents involved in the DECA Program?

    A:
    The DECA Program involves parents in several ways:
    • The teacher and the parent complete the DECA Record Form to create a complete picture of the child.
    • DECA results are shared and discussed with parents.
    • Parents are included when planning strategies to help their child build protective factors and address behavior concerns.
    • For Now and Forever offers an overview of social and emotional development and protective factors. It also offers strategies parents can use at home.
    • "Partnerships with Families" is one of the five program elements used as the framework for developmentally appropriate strategies on the Reflective Checklists.
    • Classroom staff are encouraged to reflect and improve upon their own skills in working with families by using strategies such as these:
      • Learn about each child's family, culture and community
      • Use children's home languages at the program
      • Establish an ongoing system for exchanging information about each child with his or her family.
      • Give families information about typical developmental skills and behaviors of young children.
      • Use a variety of communication strategies to keep families informed about the program.
      • Incorporate family involvement in the program design.
      • Reduce and/or avoid adding to a family's stress.
      • Support each child's relationship and connection with all nurturing family members, as legally appropriate.

  2. Is parental consent needed in order to administer the DECA?

    A:
    It is highly recommended that you seek parental permission prior to administering any form of child assessment. Often, parental consent is granted through a blanket letter at time of enrollment or at the beginning of each year which lists and describes all the assessment tools and evaluations to be conducted throughout the year.Follow this link for a sample Parental Consent Form that you can edit to meet your own program's needs.

Answers: DECA Program Goals and Philosophy

  1. Is the DECA Program designed to help kids with behavior problems?

    A:
    Yes and No. The DECA Program supports the whole class through implementation of strategies such as those described in the Classroom Strategies guide. We believe that a developmentally appropriate environment, the daily program, activities and experiences, supportive interactions, and partnerships with families foster overall social and emotional development. The strategies help all children build protective factors and reduce or eliminate challenging behaviors. DECA results for the whole class are summarized on the DECA Classroom Profile, a tool teachers can use to focus planning for individuals and the group. Additional planning forms and strategies are included to plan for children with challenging behaviors.

  2. Does the DECA fit with other instruments a program may be using?

    A:
    The DECA Program was designed to fit within existing systems, filling the gaps, to help promote healthy social and emotional health in preschool children. The DECA Program is not a curriculum, but provides strategies and planning activities that will enhance the classroom environment, daily program, activities and experiences, supportive interactions, and partnerships with families. The DECA serves as a social and emotional assessment for children, as well as a behavioral concerns screener, two requirements for many quality early childhood programs.

  3. What makes the DECA Program better than the social/emotional or behavioral checklist my program is already using?

    A:
    The DECA Program is not just an assessment tool, it is an entire system of strategies and planning for children and classrooms. The DECA Program follows the strength-based model of Resiliency, making it a unique tool. Unlike many instruments, the DECA has reliability and validity, and is standardized and norm-referenced. The standardization sample consisted of 2,000 children across the Nation who had varying socio-economic status and various racial and ethnic backgrounds. The sample was representative of the National population.

  4. Should the DECA results be used to refer a child for a formal evaluation?

    A:
    No assessment instrument should be used as the only criterion for referral. Although the DECA provides important referral information, multiple sources of information, including parental input, should influence the decision. A major piece of the information gathering process should be observation. For more information and guidance on using the DECA for referral purposes, please contact Devereux. For information on the DECA-C (Clinical version), contact Devereux.

  5. What is the difference between the DECA and the DECA-C?

    A:
    As a strength-based assessment, the DECA is appropriate for all children, ages 2-5, and in best practice is completed by both parents and teachers and used in the context of the entire DECA Program. While the DECA is appropriate for use with all children, the DECA-C is to be used only with children who are already exhibiting significant emotional and behavioral concerns. Although the DECA-C can be used by itself in clinic or research settings, in best practice the DECA-C should be used as part of an overall system, like the DECA Program, to foster the healthy social and emotional development of children. The primary purpose of the DECA-C is to support early intervention efforts to reduce or eliminate significant emotional and behavioral concerns, and can also be used to guide interventions, help identify children needing special services, assess outcomes, and help programs meet Head Start, IDEA and similar requirements. In addition, the DECA-C was designed to facilitate collaboration among parents, preschool teachers and mental health professionals.

  6. Is the DECA an assessment, a screener or both?

    A:
    The DECA is a behavioral rating scale that includes a total of 37 items- 27 of which assess a child's protective factors related to resilience (initiative, self-control and attachment) and 10 of which screen for behavioral concerns. Devereux describes the tool as an assessment of protective factors and a screener for behavioral concerns. Therefore, the tool is appropriate for use as a screening instrument, but in addition, provides valuable information about a child's protective factors. It is the unique aspect of assessing protective factors that makes the DECA such a strong choice for programs to use as their social/emotional screener. The DECA not only screens for behavior problems, but in addition, collects information about a child's resilience. Devereux's philosophy, which is supported by resilience research, is that intervention should not be put off until a child is displaying behavior problems, but rather, should begin if a child is showing a lack of protective factors. Resilience research indicates the importance of promoting children's protective factors as a means of preventing the development of emotional/behavioral problems.

  7. Should the DECA be used with children who have special needs?

    A:
    We encourage programs to use the DECA with all children in the class, not just those already showing behavioral concerns and not excluding those with specific disabilities. While we promote the use of the DECA with all children, we also caution programs that staff need to be sensitive to specific situations and not in any way use information gained from the DECA in ways that would be harmful or detrimental to a child and his/her family. For instance, if a child with severe disabilities scored entirely in the concern range on the DECA protective factor scales, the individual interpreting and sharing that information with families needs to be sensitive to the child's particular condition. The information gained through the DECA should be communicated with families and used to develop plans and implement strategies that will promote those protective factors for the child. Additionally, for children who score in the concern range across the board on protective factors, we recommend looking at the individual items on the protective factor scales to determine the child’s relative strengths and goals. This information, as well as continuous observations, can be very useful in the planning process. While Devereux does not have data on the representation of children with disabilities in our standardization sample, we know that children with disabilities were included based on their inclusion in the numerous Head Start Programs that participated in the standardization process.

  8. Why should a program conduct running records observations?

    A:
    Although in the standardization of the DECA observations were not required of the individuals administering the tool, DECI recommends conducting running records observations for two main reasons. First, this type of observation provides accurate, objective and complete information without including the observer's judgments or biases. This information can help teachers to more accurately complete the DECA, leading to more accurate results. Second, these observation recordings provide data that can be shared with parents and used by professionals and specialists from different disciplines. This information can then be used to effectively plan interventions both at the universal and targeted levels, if necessary.

Answers: DECA Program Challenges

  1. What are some ways to overcome observation challenges in the classroom?

    A:
    See "Observation Tips for Teachers" in the Classroom Strategies guide, page 30. In addition, here are some suggestions from Early Childhood professionals:
    1. Conduct several shorter observations on each child, rather than one long observation.
    2. Observe several children at a time while they are engaged in small group activities.
    3. Use a video or audio recorder, then review the tapes at a later time.
    4. Target one child per day.
    5. Arrange the environment to create clear observation paths.
    6. Wear an "observation hat" to let children know you are busy for a few minutes.
    7. Plan time into your daily schedule to observe. Note the observer, target child(ren), time and place.
    8. Observe on the days when volunteers or parents are present in your classroom.
    9. Hire or use a floating staff member for observation days.
    10. Develop and use a shorthand system so you can write quickly and capture more detail.
    11. Provide on-going training for staff on conducting running records observations.
Answers: Training and Technical Assistance for the DECA Program
  1. An Early Childhood Program wants to learn more about the DECA Program. What presentation options are available?

    A:
    Members of the DECI team are available to provide presentations on the DECA Program. Please contact us via our online form or call us toll free at (866) TRAIN US for more information.

  2. An Early Childhood Program has purchased (or is in the process or purchasing) the DECA Program. What intensive implementation trainings are available?

    A:
    Should a program choose to implement the DECA Program, a minimum of a one-day training is suggested for staff. Training is available in several formats: 1-day implementation training, 2-day implementation training, or the training may be split into two different training days. The first day covers background information and steps 1-3 of the DECA Program, the second day occurs after teachers and parents have completed steps 1-3 and are ready to plan for individuals and the group of children, and to measure outcome data. Please contact us via our online form or call us toll free at (866) TRAIN US for more information.

  3. An Early Childhood Program has trained their staff, but wants access to ongoing technical assistance from a qualified trainer. What options are available?

    A.
    Devereux has developed a Local Program Mentor (LPM) training designed for individuals who provide technical assistance. In addition, Devereux has a variety of options for Technical Assistance, offered through our Certified Trainers. Web-based Learning, Conference Calls, Video Conferencing, and On-site Visits are a few of the options we offer. In addition, a FREE technical assistance resource is available on our website. The DECA Program web-log allows for DECA Program users to post questions, ideas, challenges and successes. This forum allows Devereux to communicate with users as well as users to communicate with one another.
    Please contact us via our online form or call us toll free at (866) TRAIN US for more information.

  4. Are CEUs offered for DECA Program Training?

    A:
    CEUs are offered for DECA Program training. Additional credits may be available depending upon your State and your college degree and/or licensing/certification. Please contact us via our online form or call us toll free at (866) TRAIN US for more information.

Answers: Other Questions

  1. How do I order the children's story, Bob "Butterbean" Love?

    A:
    To order, please contact:
    Kaplan Early Learning Company, Inc.
    1-800-334-2014, http://www.kaplanco.com/
    Item #10107, $14.95

  2. How do I order the software for playing Jeopardy?

    A:
    The software is called Game Show Pro and can be ordered from the following company:

    The Trainer's Warehouse
    89 Washington Avenue
    Natwick, MA 01760
    (800) 299-3770
    http://www.learningware.com/

  3. How do I order the “Starting Small” kit?

    A:
    Free to schools, additional kits are $30 each. To order, send a written request on school letterhead, signed by a principal or administrator, by fax: (334) 956-8486.
    Or by mail:
    Teaching Tolerance, Order Department
    400 Washington Avenue
    Montgomery, AL 36104
    All items shipped 4th Class Library Rate. Please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. If a faster delivery is desired, please call the Order Department at (334) 956-8362 for more information.

  4. Some of the books in For Now and Forever are out of print, what other children's books does Devereux recommend?

    A:
    Three of the children's books listed in For Now and Forever, Three Star Billy, The Rat and the Tiger and Cleversticks are out of print. Two other children's books that emphasize self-control and are available are Double-Dip Feelings by Barbara Cain and Contrary Bear by Phyllis Root. Kaplan also offers a set of children’s books that focus on resilience. If you are interested in this resource, please visit the Kaplan website or the Kaplan catalogue. The order number for the set of books is #46793.

  5. What DECA Program Kit Resources do I need to order for my program/classroom(s)?

    A:
    Please note that prices are subject to change. In an ideal world, where early childhood programs have more than adequate funding levels, all classrooms would have their own DECA Program Kit for $199.95. However, this will not be possible for many early childhood programs and the DECA Program can certainly be effectively implemented without each classroom having their own kit. Therefore, here are “general guidelines” to help programs determine what resources are needed to implement the DECA Program.

    All of the resources included in the Kit may be purchased separately through Kaplan:

    • * DECA Record Forms (40) & Parent/Teacher Profiles (40) - $39.95
    • * For Now and Forever Parent’s Strategies guides (20)- $24.95
    • User’s Guide - $39.95
    • Technical Manual - $19.95
    • * Classroom Strategies guide - $49.95
    • Observation Journal - $24.95

    * The DECA Record Forms, Parent Strategies guides, and Classroom Strategies guide are available in both English and Spanish.

    While DECA Program resources can certainly be shared by staff, several variables will affect how easily or how difficult sharing the resources will be. For example, the number of separate geographic locations, the number of children, the number of classrooms in a specific location, the number of supervising staff overseeing DECA Program implementation, and the number of family support staff all need to be taken into consideration when determining how resources can be shared within a particular program. Following are some “general” guidelines to help determine the quantities of the various resources that need to be purchased in order to implement the DECA Program.

    Classroom Strategies guide one per classroom is preferable.

    User’s Guide one per classroom is preferable; one per geographic location may be adequate. If staff go through DECA Program Basic Implementation Training with a Certified Trainer, this resource is not typically recommended.

    Technical Manual
    one per geographic location should be adequate. If there are a large number of classrooms under one roof, it may be preferable to have more than one Technical Manual available for referencing.

    Observation Journal
    one per geographic location should be adequate. If there are a large number of classrooms under one roof, it may be preferable to have more than one Observation Journal. The contents of the Observation Journal can be reproduced, making it a relatively easy resource to share.

    For Now and Forever
    Parent Strategies guides
    - one for every family is preferable.

    DECA Record Forms -- enough for every child to have two assessments per school year by both the teacher and parent

    • Individuals who provide consultation to teachers, such as Education Coordinators, Mental health / Disability Specialists, Curriculum Specialists would benefit from having their own complete DECA Program Kit
    • Each year, programs that are using the DECA Program would need to reorder the following materials:
      • DECA Record Formsenough for every child to have two assessment per school year by both the teacher and parent
      • For Now and Forever Parent Strategies guides for every family

    Other Devereux Early Childhood Assessment Resources available through Kaplan:

    • Parent/Teacher Profiles (40) - $5.95
    • Children’s Books that Promote Resilience (15 books) - $159.95
    • DECA-C (Clinical) Kit - $125.95
    • DECA-C Manual - $54.95
    • DECA-C Record Forms- $59.95
    • DECA-C Norms Reference Card - $6.95

    e-DECA Resources available through Kaplan:

    • e-DECA (electronic version)- Annual License Fee -$249.95
    • e-DECA by Administration Option (block of 40 administrations) -$39.95
    • e-DECA by Child Option (unlimited e-DECAs for a 12 month period) - $2.95 per child
Devereux recommends ordering resources through your local Kaplan Representative. For assistance in reaching your local representative call (800) 334-2014 or visit http://www.kaplanco.com/.
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